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3: CSS Transitions and Eases - Creating Motion on the HTML Page

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    20100

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    Introduction to Transitions and Eases

    Everything up until this point has been static animation; animation that jumps from one point to another point without a smooth transition between the two stopping points. In this chapter, we'll take a look at how to create transitions with keyframes that will animate properties over time on our HTML pages. Then, we'll talk about using one of the finer points of animation techniques: easing. Let's go!


    This page titled 3: CSS Transitions and Eases - Creating Motion on the HTML Page is shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Rosemary Barker.

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