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3: Reactance and Impedance - Inductive

  • Page ID
    1393
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    • 3.1: AC Resistor Circuits (Inductive)
    • 3.2: AC Inductor Circuits
      Inductors do not behave the same way resistors do. Whereas resistors simply oppose the flow of electrons through them (by dropping a voltage directly proportional to the current), inductors oppose changes in current through them, by dropping a voltage directly proportional to the rate of change of current. In accordance with Lenz’s Law (which you can read more about here), this induced voltage is always of such a polarity as to try to maintain current at its present value.
    • 3.3: Series Resistor-Inductor Circuits
      In the previous section, we explored what would happen in simple resistor-only and inductor-only AC circuits. Now we will mix the two components together in series form and investigate the effects.
    • 3.4: Parallel Resistor-Inductor Circuits
    • 3.5: Inductor Quirks
    • 3.6: What Is the Skin Effect? The Skin Depth of Copper in Electrical Engineering
      The skin effect is where alternating current tends to avoid travel through the center of a solid conductor, limiting itself to conduction near the surface. This effectively limits the cross-sectional conductor area available to carry alternating electron flow, increasing the resistance of that conductor above what it would normally be for direct current.


    This page titled 3: Reactance and Impedance - Inductive is shared under a GNU Free Documentation License 1.3 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Tony R. Kuphaldt (All About Circuits) via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.