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2.2: Applying the Math of Geometric Shapes

  • Page ID
    7129
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    As with all mathematical computations, there is an element of “Will I ever use this outside of the classroom?”. The answer is most likely “sometimes.” An operator might calculate the volume of water in a storage structure or pipeline to determine how much chlorine is needed to disinfect the structure. A contractor might calculate the internal surface area of a tank to determine the amount of coating that is required. Or, you might be asked to paint the interior walls of a room. Putting practical use to mathematical equations can help in the student’s overall understanding. The following problems are some “real-world examples” you might find working as a water utility operator.

    Exercises

    Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\)



    This page titled 2.2: Applying the Math of Geometric Shapes is shared under a CC BY license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Mike Alvord (ZTC Textbooks) .

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