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12.2: Mixing and Diluting Solutions

  • Page ID
    7194
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    Another common process with chemicals is the mixing of solutions with different strengths, or diluting a certain chemical concentration strength with water. Let’s look at a dilution based example first.

    • If 700 mL of water is added to 250 mL of a 65% concentration strength solution, what is the resulting concentration strength?

    In the above example, the resulting volume is 950 mL. This is calculated by adding 700 mL to 250 mL. The formula used to calculate the new concentration strength is the following:

    • C1V1 = C2V2
    • 0.65 x 250 mL = C1 x 950 mL

    The left side of the equation becomes 162.5 and this is divided by 950 mL to get the diluted concentration strength.

    • 162.5950 = 0.17 or 17%

    This says if 250 mL of a 65% solution is diluted with 750 mL of water, the resulting concentration will be 17%.

    By mixing two solutions of different strengths and known volumes the resulting strength can be calculated. Let’s look at the following example.

    • 700 mL of a chemical with a concentration strength of 25% is mixed with 250 mL of 65% concentration strength. What is the resulting concentration strength?

    In the example above, the resulting volume is 950 mL. This is calculated by adding 700 mL and 250 mL.


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