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7: Electromagnetism

  • Page ID
    13288
    • Camosun College
    • BCCampus (Download for free at http://open.bccampus.ca/find-open-textbooks)
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    A magnet attracts ferrous metals and some alloys. Magnets can take three forms: natural, artificial, and electric. Natural magnets (i.e., magnetite) are very weak. Artificial magnets are made from magnetic materials (such as iron, nickel, and cobalt) and are given a strong magnetic force during construction. These are permanent magnets and have some limited use. Electromagnets can be easily turned on and off and are in common use because they are not permanent. They are called temporary magnets.

    • 7.1: Magnetic Fields
    • 7.2: Permanent Magnets
      Centuries ago, it was discovered that certain types of mineral rock possessed unusual properties of attraction to the metal iron. One particular mineral, called lodestone, or magnetite, is found mentioned in very old historical records (about 2500 years ago in Europe, and much earlier in the Far East) as a subject of curiosity. Later, it was employed in the aid of navigation, as it was found that a piece of this unusual rock would tend to orient itself in a north-south direction if left free to
    • 7.3: Electromagnetism
      The discovery of the relationship between magnetism and electricity was, like so many other scientific discoveries, stumbled upon almost by accident. The Danish physicist Hans Christian Oersted was lecturing one day in 1820 on the possibility of electricity and magnetism being related to one another, and in the process demonstrated it conclusively by experiment in front of his whole class! By passing an electric current through a metal wire suspended above a magnetic compass, Oersted was able to
    • 7.4: Magnetic Units of Measurement
      If the burden of two systems of measurement for common quantities (English vs. metric) throws your mind into confusion, this is not the place for you! Due to an early lack of standardization in the science of magnetism, we have been plagued with no less than three complete systems of measurement for magnetic quantities.
    • 7.5: Permeability and Saturation
    • 7.6: Electromagnetic Induction
      While Oersted’s surprising discovery of electromagnetism paved the way for more practical applications of electricity, it was Michael Faraday who gave us the key to the practical generation of electricity: electromagnetic induction. Faraday discovered that a voltage would be generated across a length of wire if that wire was exposed to a perpendicular magnetic field flux of changing intensity.
    • 7.7: Mutual Inductance
      If two coils of wire are brought into close proximity with each other so the magnetic field from one links with the other, a voltage will be generated in the second coil as a result. This is called mutual inductance: when voltage impressed upon one coil induces a voltage in another.
    • 7.8: Electricity and Magnetism


    7: Electromagnetism is shared under a CC BY license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Camosun College.

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