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8.5: Using Windows Photos

  • Page ID
    13617
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    Starting up the Photos app is simple: for most new machines and fresh installations of Windows 10, it’s already in the Start menu as a big tile. Even if it’s not, just press “Start” and then begin typing “photos” to bring it up quickly via search. (Using Windows 10 Built in Photo Editor, n.d.)


    This page titled 8.5: Using Windows Photos is shared under a CC BY license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Nick Heisserer (Minnesota State Opendora) .

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